Wednesday, May 21, 2008

Hunter Gatherers.




Just this morning we were laughing about being "Hunter Gatherers" and I realised I certainly am in at least 2 ways. Fabric for one - I hunt it down and then gather it. In the photo you can see the now complete 2 piles ready for my class on Friday. So yes, Andrea I am ready but can't start till then. ( there are 120 purple rectangles, each 2.5" by 9" and 120 green rectangles the same measurements. ) In preparation I have cleaned thoroughly and oiled my machine and packed it and all the gear I need in my 2 trolley bags . I have wound extra bobbins; renamed my gear where it was rubbing off and now hope I haven't forgotten anything!( I better check my requirements list one last time ) Isn't it strange how colours in photos change, with the light, I guess, but when I compare the photo of the fabric here and the one in the last post they appear different. IN the flesh so to speak, I really like the colours so hope they go well together in the quilt.
What we were really talking about with hunting and gathering was all the things we collect in Autumn that we grow.Some you know about the Kiwifruit and Avocados and Walnuts but we also grow other things. See here the basket of Persimmons - one of my most favourite fruit. They are not perfect like shop bought ones but they are off our tree and I had to pick some before the birds took them all - they are mean they start eating way before the fruit is properly ripe so if I want any at all I have to pick them early. We are also collecting Chestnuts and roasting them in the microwave. This year they are lovely - that's not always the case, so it has to be to do with the weather, amount of rain and early heat. We have a Sapote tree that the possums are enjoying so we pick some of them too. They don't keep well so it is no use picking lots at a time.
For the hunting part we set traps and poison bait stations for the possums and DH shoots rabbits - but that's about as wild as it gets - no big game!
Inky is almost back to normal the bald spots are covering over and he seems fine.( not limping ).
For quilting at the moment I am still handquilting the flower quilt and would you believe I am unpicking a large top I made some years ago that I don't like. It was made to use up scraps and I also introduced nice big pale blue 18" squares. The scraps spoil it so it is coming undone slowly cause I want the fabric back to use somewhere that I like it. All the other bits can go back in my parts departments ( ziplock plastic bags for various sizes actually ) When I iron the big squares out they still have plenty of potential. Never thought I would do that; but there ya go!
Roll on Friday!

7 comments:

Molly said...

Didn't even know you had possums down there! I always learn something new when I come here...I have never tasted persimmons. Can you tell us what they are closest to in taste----Peaches? Apricots? Citrus of any kind? Their colour is beautiful....

anne bebbington said...

Those purples and greens are looking lovely - can't wait to see what you do with them

Guðrún said...

What are those persimmons?

Ali Honey said...

I can't describe what persimmons taste like...they taste like persimmons, not anything else. But they are lovely, sweet juicy delights if completely ripe. A bag of clear bright orange jelly. Modern varieties can also be eaten earlier in the crisp stage(when they have the texture of an apple) Old fashioned persimmons had to be completely ripe or they were very very astringent; but better varieties are available now. The bonus is they have wonderful bright red and orange leaves just as the fruit is ripening.

I will take a photo of the inside and show you.

meggie said...

My mother's favourite fruit were Persimmons- the ones that needed to be almost rotten, before eating! They are lovely, & the modern ones are really delicious, slightly crisp. I understand they are a Chinese fruit? much like Kiwifruit.

Diana said...

I had to laugh about your persimmons. They are a wild fruit around here (Indiana) and every year we have to compete with deer, raccoons, possums, and the birds to harvest some. The wild ones are very astringent, really just some connective tissue holding together lots and lots of seeds. It takes a lot of elbow grease to separate the pulp from the seeds, but it is so worth it!

Deb H said...

I've never eaten a persimmon. How do you eat them? Just plain? Raw? Are they tomatoe-like?